Vico Equense

Vico Equense

This is the first town on the Sorrento peninsula that you see coming from the city. Vico Equense, in the Province of Napoli, sits on a limestone cliff that descends steeply to the gulf, in a section that extends from Scrajo, a location with hot springs, to Punta Scutolo.
The name Vico is supposed to derive from the “vici” (small villages on the main roads) and then became Vicus Aequensis from the name of the main village, called Borgo dei Cavalieri. In 1301, Charles of Anjou had a castle built here that was renovated, three centuries later, by Count Girolamo Giusso and, for this reason, it is called Castello Giusso.
Surrounded by green hills and sun-drenched cliffs, the area of Vico is the most extensive on the peninsula. In fact, the countryside that rises towards Mount Faito includes a series of small villages surrounded by citrus and olive groves and vineyards. These are called the Casali, which are groups of houses that were built as refuges for the inhabitants of the area and that are now are used for pleasant excursions. Most of them can be reached from a single road, Via Raffaele Bosco: San Salvatore, Massaquano, Moiano, Santa Maria del Castello, Ticciano, Preazzano, Arola, Fornacelle, Pacognano and Seiano. On the other hand, by following the coastal roads you will come to Montechiaro and Santa Maria del Toro.
Vico is still laid out on its original Roman plan, even though the present city dates from the 14th century when Charles II of Anjou founded the new walled village, as demonstrated by several traces including the portals and windows of the old town centre.
This is the period in which the Gothic Cathedral was built on the seaside overlooking the Marina of Aequa, where there are many bathing establishments and tourist facilities.
The town’s main streets lead to Piazza Umberto I. The Church of Santi Ciro e Giovanni the patrons of Vico, is at the end of the Corso of the same name; it was built in a late-Baroque style in 1715. The street parallel to the Corso, Via San Ciro leads to the Museo Mineralogico Campano, which holds almost 5,000 fossils and minerals from all over the world.
It’s also worth taking a tour of the area?s farms to sample the flavours of the Sorrento peninsula. In fact, the area’s citrus fruits are celebrated in lemon and tangerine liqueurs while those who love pizza don?t need to be homesick for Naples: just have someone take you to the place where ?pizza by the metre? was invented and you can use centimetres to measure your appetite for Campania’s most famous dish that has been exported throughout the world.